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1 February 2007 Red-Headed Woodpecker Nest-Habitat Thresholds in Restored Savannas
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Abstract

The red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) is a widespread, adaptable species that continues to decline across North America. We examined stand, nest-tree, and cavity characteristics of red-headed woodpeckers in restored savannas within the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin, USA, during 2002 and 2003. Based on availability, red-headed woodpeckers selected snags and trees with greater dead limb length. Red-headed woodpeckers nested in areas with greater basal area, cavity density, snag density, limb-tree density, and total dead limb length. Red-headed woodpeckers exhibited a decadent-tree threshold that was most accurately measured by the number of trees with dead limbs around (0.04 ha) nests. We found that the probability of a red-headed woodpecker nest being present greatly increased above the decadent-tree threshold. Woodland managers throughout the red-headed woodpecker's extensive breeding range can use our results and recommendations to guide decadent-tree retention for this species.

RICHARD S. KING, KATHERINE E. BRASHEAR, and MANDIN REIMAN "Red-Headed Woodpecker Nest-Habitat Thresholds in Restored Savannas," Journal of Wildlife Management 71(1), 30-35, (1 February 2007). https://doi.org/10.2193/2005-590
Published: 1 February 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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