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1 August 2008 Eradication of Feral Pigs From Pinnacles National Monument
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Abstract

Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have caused considerable damage where they have been introduced around the world. At Pinnacles National Monument, California, USA, managers were concerned that feral pigs were damaging wetland habitats, reducing oak regeneration, competing with native wildlife, and dispersing nonnative plant species through soil disturbance. To address these threats the National Park Service constructed an exclosure around 57 km2 of monument land and through cooperation with the Institute for Wildlife Studies eradicated all feral pigs within the area. Trapping, ground-hunting, hunting dogs, and Judas techniques were used to remove feral pigs. Trapping techniques removed most pigs, but a combination of techniques was required to cause eradication. A series of bait sites and transects across the monument helped focus removal efforts and facilitated detection of the last remaining feral pigs in the exclosure. Consistent funding and cooperation from the National Park Service allowed for a seamless and comprehensive program that provided intensive removal of feral pigs. The successful eradication of feral pigs at Pinnacles National Monument should encourage managers in other areas to implement future control or eradication programs.

Blake E. McCann and David K. Garcelon "Eradication of Feral Pigs From Pinnacles National Monument," Journal of Wildlife Management 72(6), 1287-1295, (1 August 2008). https://doi.org/10.2193/2007-164
Published: 1 August 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

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