Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2002 SURGICAL CASTRATION AND THE EFFECT ON AGGRESSION IN ROCK HYRAX (PROCAVIA CAPENSIS)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Lincoln Park Zoo acquired five intact, male rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis) from three separate institutions to exhibit as a group. The animals were of varying ages at the time of acquisition. During quarantine, all five were surgically castrated via a midline laparotomy technique in an attempt to reduce expected aggression within the group. Recommendations for successful castration, based on these five procedures, include performing the procedure on sexually immature hyraxes or sexually inactive adults, the use of a second surgeon during the procedure, and the use of stainless steel surgical clips for ligation of vessels and spermatic cord. Although combinations of the castrated animals coexisted for longer periods than those documented for other nonrelated male groups, aggression was significant and resulted in the death of one individual. Ultimately, all animals were housed individually.

Ann Manharth and Laurel Harris-Gerber "SURGICAL CASTRATION AND THE EFFECT ON AGGRESSION IN ROCK HYRAX (PROCAVIA CAPENSIS)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 33(1), (1 March 2002). https://doi.org/10.1638/1042-7260(2002)033[0080:SCATEO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 10 September 2001; Published: 1 March 2002
JOURNAL ARTICLE
3 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top