Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2004 THYROID CYSTADENOMA, COLLOID GOITER, AND HYPOTHYROIDISM IN AN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR(URSUS AMERICANUS)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

A 178-kg, 14-yr-old captive female American black bear (Ursus americanus) was examined because of lethargy, inappetance, obesity, and alopecia. Serum chemistry and complete blood count values were within normal limits. Based on serum levels for total thyroxine (T4), free T4 by equilibrium dialysis (fT4ED), and canine thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations, using assays validated for domestic dogs, hypothyroidism was diagnosed presumptively, and therapy with levothyroxine sodium (0.022 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d.) was initiated. Haircoat, body weight, appetite, and activity level improved within 30 days. The levothyroxine dose was decreased twice (to 0.018 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d. and then to 0.011 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d.) during the course of treatment based on monitoring of serum T4 and fT4ED concentrations. After euthanasia for severe refractory lameness, postmortem examination revealed bilateral thyroid lobe enlargement and a fluid-filled cyst within the right lobe. Histologically, colloid goiter was present in both lobes, and a follicular cystadenoma had replaced one third of the cranial pole of the right lobe. The goiter and cystadenoma likely contributed to the hypothyroid condition in this bear, and fT4ED was a more sensitive indicator of hypothyroidism than was T4. The recommended canine dosage of levothyroxine may be too high for the treatment of hypothyroidism in American black bears; 0.011 mg/kg p.o. b.i.d. may be a more appropriate dosage.

Timothy N. Storms, Shelley L. Beazley, Juergen Schumacher, and Edward C. Ramsay "THYROID CYSTADENOMA, COLLOID GOITER, AND HYPOTHYROIDISM IN AN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR(URSUS AMERICANUS)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 35(1), 82-87, (1 March 2004). https://doi.org/10.1638/03-033
Received: 31 March 2003; Published: 1 March 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top