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1 June 2005 A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PRESENTATION, TREATMENT, AND OUTCOME OF FREE-RANGING RAPTORS IN GREECE (1997–2000)
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Abstract

A retrospective study was conducted on free-ranging raptors (n = 402) presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, during a 3-yr period (1997–2000). Representatives of 19 species were admitted from taxonomic orders Accipitriformes (n = 295), Falconiformes (n = 35), and Strigiformes (n = 72). Traumatic injuries (n = 305, 75.8%) were the most common cause of presentation in all raptors. Starvation (n = 38 birds, 9.4%) was the second most common reason, whereas toxicoses (n = 28, 6.9%) were suspected in a limited number of birds. Orphans (n = 31, 7.7%) were presented during breeding season primarily because of inappropriate human intervention. Surgical and medical treatment was given to all birds when necessary. In total, 229 (56.9%) of the presented raptors were successfully rehabilitated and released, 121 (30%) were rehabilitated but nonreleasable, whereas 52 (12.9%) of them died despite treatment. Human intervention (79.2%) plays the most important role in birds of prey morbidity and mortality.

A. Th Komnenou, I. Georgopoulou, I. Savvas, and A. Dessiris "A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF PRESENTATION, TREATMENT, AND OUTCOME OF FREE-RANGING RAPTORS IN GREECE (1997–2000)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 36(2), 222-228, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1638/04-061.1
Received: 15 July 2004; Published: 1 June 2005
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