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1 June 2005 EXPOSURE OF FREE-RANGING MANED WOLVES (CHRYSOCYON BRACHYURUS) TO INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASE AGENTS IN THE NOËL KEMPFF MERCADO NATIONAL PARK, BOLIVIA
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Abstract

Maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) are neotropic mammals, listed as a CITES Appendix II species, with a distribution south of the Amazon forest from Bolivia, through northern Argentina and Paraguay and into eastern Brazil and northern Uruguay. Primary threats to the survival of free-ranging maned wolves include habitat loss, road kills, and shooting by farmers. An additional threat to the conservation of maned wolves is the risk of morbidity and mortality due to infectious and parasitic diseases. Captive maned wolves are susceptible to, and die from, common infectious diseases of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) including canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), rabies virus, and canine adenovirus (CAV). Results from this study show that free-ranging maned wolves in a remote area of Bolivia have been exposed to multiple infectious and parasitic agents of domestic carnivores, including CAV, CDV, CPV, canine coronavirus, rabies virus, Leptospira interrogans spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Dirofilaria immitis, and may be at increased risk for disease due to these agents.

Sharon L. Deem and LOUISE H. EMMONS "EXPOSURE OF FREE-RANGING MANED WOLVES (CHRYSOCYON BRACHYURUS) TO INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASE AGENTS IN THE NOËL KEMPFF MERCADO NATIONAL PARK, BOLIVIA," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 36(2), (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1638/04-076.1
Received: 14 September 2004; Published: 1 June 2005
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