Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2013 THE EFFECTS OF HIBERNATION AND CAPTIVITY ON GLUCOSE METABOLISM AND THYROID HORMONES IN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR (URSUS AMERICANUS)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

American black bears (Ursus americanus) have been shown to become transiently insulin resistant and hypothyroid during winter, but no studies have investigated these changes in long-term captive bears or in bears which remain awake year-round. Wild, captive hibernating, and captive nonhibernating bears were evaluated at times corresponding to three of their major physiologic stages: fall (hyperphagic stage), winter (hibernation stage), and summer (normal activity stage). Combined insulin and glucose tolerance tests and thyroid hormone profiles were performed on all bears during each stage. All three groups of bears had evidence of insulin resistance during the winter, as compared to the summer or fall, based on glucose tolerance curves. Analysis of thyroid hormone concentration varied and distinct patterns or similarities were not apparent. While obesity in captive American black bears is multifactorial, the finding that, regardless of their ability to hibernate, captive bears retain similar physiology to their wild counterparts indicates that captive bears' complex physiologic changes need to be addressed in their management.

American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Stephanie McCain, Ed Ramsay, and Claudia Kirk "THE EFFECTS OF HIBERNATION AND CAPTIVITY ON GLUCOSE METABOLISM AND THYROID HORMONES IN AMERICAN BLACK BEAR (URSUS AMERICANUS)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 44(2), 324-332, (1 June 2013). https://doi.org/10.1638/2012-0146R1.1
Received: 2 July 2012; Published: 1 June 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top