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1 June 2013 EFFICACY OF TREATMENT AND LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF BATRACHOCHYTRIUM DENDROBATIDIS PCR-POSITIVE ANURANS FOLLOWING ITRACONAZOLE BATH TREATMENT
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Abstract

All anuran specimens in the Wildlife Conservation Society's collections testing positive for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) were treated with itraconazole and then studied after treatment to assess the long-term effects of itraconazole and the drug's effectiveness in eliminating Bd carriers. Twenty-four individuals and eight colonies of 11 different species (75 total specimens) tested positive for Bd via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on multicollection survey. All positive individuals and colonies were treated with a 0.01% itraconazole bath solution and retested for Bd via one of two PCR methodologies within 14 days of treatment completion, and all were negative for Bd. A total of 64 animals received secondary follow-up PCR testing at the time of death, 6–8 mo, or 12–15 mo post-treatment. Fourteen animals (14/64, 21.9%) were PCR positive for Bd on second follow-up. The highest percentage positive at second recheck were green-and-black poison dart frogs (Dendrobates auratus; 5/5 specimens, 100%), followed by red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas; 4/11, 36.4%), grey tree frogs (Hyla versicolor; 1/3, 33.3%), and green tree frogs (Hyla cinera; 3/11, 27.3%). Re-testing by PCR performed on 26/28 individuals that died during the study indicated 11/26 (42.3%) were positive (all via DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded skin sections). However, there was no histologic evidence of chytridiomycosis in any of 27/28 individuals. The small number of deceased animals and effects of postmortem autolysis limited the ability to determine statistical trends in the pathology data, but none of the necropsied specimens showed evidence of itraconazole toxicity. Problems with itraconazole may be species dependent, and this report expands the list of species that can tolerate treatment. Although itraconazole is effective for clearance of most individuals infected with Bd, results of the study suggest that repeat itraconazole treatment and follow-up diagnostics may be required to ensure that subclinical infections are eliminated in amphibian collections.

American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Timothy A. Georoff, Robert P. Moore, Carlos Rodriguez, Allan P. Pessier, Alisa L. Newton, Denise McAloose, and Paul P. Calle "EFFICACY OF TREATMENT AND LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF BATRACHOCHYTRIUM DENDROBATIDIS PCR-POSITIVE ANURANS FOLLOWING ITRACONAZOLE BATH TREATMENT," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 44(2), 395-403, (1 June 2013). https://doi.org/10.1638/2012-0219R.1
Received: 18 September 2012; Published: 1 June 2013
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