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1 June 2018 RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF ALFAXALONE AND KETAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN THE HAITIAN GIANT GALLIWASP (CELESTUS WARRENI)
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Abstract

The immobilization properties and cardiopulmonary effects following intramuscular administration of one of two chemical immobilization agents were compared in the Haitian giant galliwasp (Celestus warreni) in a prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial. Adult, clinically healthy galliwasps (n = 30) were given a randomly assigned single intramuscular injection of either 15 mg/kg alfaxalone (n = 15) or 40 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride (n = 15). Heart rate, respiratory rate, and depth classification stage were recorded every 5 min; cloacal temperature was recorded every 15 min to ensure maintenance within this species' preferred optimal temperature range (75–85°F, 24–29°C). Physical examination, radiographs, and phlebotomy were performed in all animals. Alfaxalone given intramuscularly resulted in reliable anesthetic induction, maintenance, and recovery (total duration of anesthesia 57.7 ± 23.6 min, recovery 7.9 ± 7.8 min). Ketamine hydrochloride resulted in variable levels of sedation or anesthesia and a longer recovery (total duration of anesthesia 14 ±17.5 min, recovery 47.9 ± 19.3 min). Heart and respiratory rates remained within clinically acceptable ranges in all lizards using both protocols; however, alfaxalone animals had lower heart rates and respiratory rates associated with increased anesthetic depth as compared to ketamine hydrochloride animals (heart rates: alfaxalone 59.6 ± 13.3 beats/min, ketamine hydrochloride 71.9 ± 7.9 beats/min; respiratory rates: alfaxalone 33.4 ± 16.8 breaths/min, ketamine hydrochloride 50.0 ± 16.2 breaths/min). Duration of anesthesia for alfaxalone-treated galliwasps was longer than previously reported in other studies. This study determined that a single injection of alfaxalone at 15 mg/kg administered intramuscularly can be used for consistent induction and maintenance of anesthesia and prompt recovery in the Haitian giant galliwasp, while ketamine hydrochloride even at 40 mg/kg was unreliable and is not recommended as a sole immobilization agent in the Haitian giant galliwasp.

Copyright 2018 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Laura M. Kleinschmidt, Christopher S. Hanley, John M. Sahrmann, and Luis R. Padilla "RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF ALFAXALONE AND KETAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN THE HAITIAN GIANT GALLIWASP (CELESTUS WARRENI)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 49(2), (1 June 2018). https://doi.org/10.1638/2017-0164.1
Accepted: 27 December 2017; Published: 1 June 2018
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