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1 June 2006 STORMWATER PONDS, CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS, AND OTHER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AS POTENTIAL BREEDING SITES FOR WEST NILE VIRUS VECTORS IN DELAWARE DURING 2004
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Abstract

We performed longitudinal surveys of mosquito larval abundance (mean mosquito larvae per dip) in 87 stormwater ponds and constructed wetlands in Delaware from June to September 2004. We analyzed selected water quality factors, water depth, types of vegetation, degree of shade, and level of insect predation in relation to mosquito abundance. The 2004 season was atypical, with most ponds remaining wet for the entire summer. In terms of West Nile virus (WNV) vectors, wetlands predominantly produced Aedes vexans, Culex pipiens pipiens, and Culex restuans. Retention ponds generally produced the same species as wetlands, except that Cx. p. pipiens was more abundant than Cx. restuans in retention ponds. Aedes vexans and Culex salinarius were the most abundant species in Conservation Restoration Enhancement Program ponds. Sand filters uniquely produced high numbers of Cx. restuans, Cx. p. pipiens, and Aedes japonicus japonicus, a newly invasive vector species. Sites that alternately dried and flooded, mostly detention ponds, forebays of retention ponds, and some wetlands often produced Ae. vexans, an occasional WNV bridge vector species. Overall, seasonal distribution of vectors was bimodal, with peaks occurring during early and late summer. Ponds with shallow sides and heavy shade generally produced an abundance of mosquitoes, unless insect predators were abundant. Bright, sunny ponds with steep sides and little vegetation generally produced the fewest mosquitoes. The associations among mosquito species and selected vegetation types are discussed.

Jack B. Gingrich, ROBERT D. ANDERSON, GREGORY M. WILLIAMS, LINDA O'CONNOR, and KEVIN HARKINS "STORMWATER PONDS, CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS, AND OTHER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AS POTENTIAL BREEDING SITES FOR WEST NILE VIRUS VECTORS IN DELAWARE DURING 2004," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 22(2), 282-291, (1 June 2006). https://doi.org/10.2987/8756-971X(2006)22[282:SPCWAO]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 June 2006
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