Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2006 Laboratory Evaluation of the Effect of Alternative Prey and Vegetation on Predation of Culex annulirostris Immatures by Australian Native Fish Species
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The impact of alternative prey and simulated vegetation on Culex annulirostris Skuse predation efficacy by Australian smelt, Retropinna semoni (Retropinnidae); crimson-spotted rainbowfish, Melanotaenia duboulayi (Melanotaeniidae); empire gudgeon, Hypseleotris compressa (Eleotridae); estuary perchlet, Ambassis marianus (Ambassidae); firetail gudgeon, Hypseleotris galii (Eleotridae); fly-specked hardyhead, Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum (Atherinidae); and Pacific blue-eye, Pseudomugil signifer (Atherinidae), was evaluated in Queensland, Australia. The presence of chironomid midge larvae and tusked frog, Adelotus brevis (Leptodactylidae), tadpoles did not have a significant negative impact on the predation rates of Cx. annulirostris by these 7 fish species. Hypseleotris galii, M. duboulayi, and R. semoni demonstrated strong preference for larvae of Cx. annulirostris over both alternative prey species. In the presence of alternative prey species, the mean predation rate of M. duboulayi on larvae of Cx. annulirostris remained greater than that of other fish species tested. When evaluated at varying densities of simulated vegetation, predation rates of all fish species were similar to those reported in open conditions.

Timothy P. Hurst, Brian H. Kay, Michael D. Brown, and Peter A. Ryan "Laboratory Evaluation of the Effect of Alternative Prey and Vegetation on Predation of Culex annulirostris Immatures by Australian Native Fish Species," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 22(3), 412-417, (1 September 2006). https://doi.org/10.2987/8756-971X(2006)22[412:LEOTEO]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 September 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top