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1 March 2008 Comparative Evaluation of Fecundity and Survivorship of Six Copepod (Copepoda: Cyclopidae) Species, In Relation to Selection of Candidate Biological Control Agents Against Aedes aegypti
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Abstract

The fecundity and survival of 6 copepod species were assessed under laboratory conditions in order to choose the best candidates to control the aquatic stages of dengue mosquitoes in the field. Females of all the 6 species (Mesocyclops aspericornis, Mesocyclops pehpeiensis, Mesocyclops woutersi, Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides , Mesocyclops ogunnus ,and Megacyclops viridis) mated more than once. Multiple mating resulted in increased egg production. The reproductive ability and longevity varied among the species, and M. aspericornis had the highest values. The lowest values were observed in M. thermocyclopoides. Multiple mating of males of M. aspericornis was also observed. The paternal fecundity decreased with each additional mating. There was no difference in the paternal fecundity between the males that mated at low and high female frequencies. The sperm stored in the M. aspericornis females remained viable for 30 days after storage under moist conditions at 25°C or 15°C. This feature in M. aspericornis represents an additional positive factor indicating that this species is a good biological agent for controlling mosquito larvae, especially in domestic water containers that may dry intermittently.

Tran Vu Phong, Nobuko Tuno, Hitoshi Kawada, and Masahiro Takagi "Comparative Evaluation of Fecundity and Survivorship of Six Copepod (Copepoda: Cyclopidae) Species, In Relation to Selection of Candidate Biological Control Agents Against Aedes aegypti," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 24(1), 61-69, (1 March 2008). https://doi.org/10.2987/5672.1
Published: 1 March 2008
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