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1 September 2009 Evaluation of Manhole Inserts as Structural Barriers to Mosquito Entry into Belowground Stormwater Systems Using a Simulated Treatment Device
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Abstract

Belowground proprietary stormwater treatment devices can produce mosquitoes, including vectors of West Nile virus. Elimination of vertical entry points such as pick holes in manhole covers may reduce the number of mosquitoes entering and reproducing in these structures. Plastic manhole dish inserts were evaluated as structural barriers against mosquito entry through pick holes in a simulated stormwater treatment device. Inserts were 100% effective at preventing mosquito entry through covers when no other openings existed. In devices configured with an open lateral conveyance pipe, the addition of an insert under the cover reduced mosquito oviposition significantly. Subsequent trials to further elucidate mosquito entry through manhole covers found a significant positive correlation between increasing number of pick holes and mosquito oviposition. Results of the study suggest the potential for manhole dish inserts to decrease the number of mosquitoes entering belowground structures. The different available stormwater treatment systems and site-specific installations may, however, provide a much greater variety of possible alternate entry points for mosquitoes than was addressed in the current study. Further work is needed in field installations to quantify the significance of pick holes to mosquito entry and determine under what conditions, if any, manhole dish inserts would be most effective and appropriate.

Justin E. Harbison, Marco E. Metzger, Vaikko Allen II, and Renjie Hu "Evaluation of Manhole Inserts as Structural Barriers to Mosquito Entry into Belowground Stormwater Systems Using a Simulated Treatment Device," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 25(3), 356-360, (1 September 2009). https://doi.org/10.2987/09-5897.1
Published: 1 September 2009
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