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1 December 2017 A Small-Scale Investigation Into the Effect of A Larvicidal Oil On Oviposition Site Preference By Aedes aegypti

Notes

1  The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the US Government. Mention of a trademark, vendor, or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the US Military and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable.

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Abstract

Larvicidal oils can be used to control immature Aedes aegypti and other pestiferous mosquitoes. To test whether oil-based larvicides also act as oviposition deterrents, indoor and semi–field trials were conducted at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence in Jacksonville, FL. In both studies, treatment cages consisted of oviposition cups lined with seed germination paper as an oviposition substrate and filled with 1-wk-old southern live oak (Quercus virginiana) leaf litter–infused water. Treatment cages consisted of 2 cups treated with CocoBear™ Mosquito Larvicidal Oil, while 2 cups were untreated. Control cages contained oviposition cups with only oak leaf litter–infused water. Gravid Ae. aegypti were released into cages and allowed to oviposit for 24 h, after which eggs were counted. The number of eggs deposited in treatment and control cages was not significantly different (indoor P = 0.0865; outdoor P = 0.9765). However, the number of eggs deposited in untreated cups was significantly greater than that deposited in treated cups within treatment cages (indoor P < 0.0001; outdoor P = 0.0050). These results suggest that the presence of the larvicidal oil CocoBear may cause gravid female Ae. aegypti to seek alternative oviposition sites.

Copyright © 2017 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.
M. T. Hall, A. C. Briley, E. J. Lindroth, J. D. Fajardo, J. E. Cilek, and A. G. Richardson "A Small-Scale Investigation Into the Effect of A Larvicidal Oil On Oviposition Site Preference By Aedes aegypti

Notes

1  The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the US Government. Mention of a trademark, vendor, or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the US Military and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable.

," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 33(4), 355-357, (1 December 2017). https://doi.org/10.2987/17-6667.1
Published: 1 December 2017
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