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1 September 2009 Advantage of Organic Supplementation of Inorganic Fertilizer in Walleye (Sander vitreus) Hatchery Ponds at Minor Clark Fish Hatchery, KY
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Abstract

We used inorganic fertilizer in three ponds at the Minor Clark Fish Hatchery and compared results with three ponds treated with a traditional combination of organic and inorganic fertilizer. Organic augmentation resulted in significantly higher water concentrations of chlorophyll a (16 vs. 7 µg L−1), total P (167 vs. 89 µg L−1), SRP (9.3 vs. 6.6 µg L−1), and inorganic nitrogen (230 vs. 184 µg L−1). Secchi depth and DO (7.9 vs. 11.2 mg L−1) were lower in the organically fertilized ponds. No filamentous algal blooms occurred in any ponds. Rotifers were the predominant zooplankton in all ponds; but traditionally fertilized ponds had greater copepod biomass. Fish survival (37%) and yield (36 kg ha−1) in inorganically fertilized ponds were much lower than previously found at Minor Clark Hatchery (about 90% survival). Although use of inorganic fertilization alone may reduce fertilizer and supplemental aeration costs in some hatcheries, it did not offset lost fish production in this study.

Brian C. Reeder and Roderick J. Middleton "Advantage of Organic Supplementation of Inorganic Fertilizer in Walleye (Sander vitreus) Hatchery Ponds at Minor Clark Fish Hatchery, KY," Journal of the Kentucky Academy of Science 70(2), 152-161, (1 September 2009). https://doi.org/10.3101/1098-7096-70.2.152
Published: 1 September 2009
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