Translator Disclaimer
5 January 2019 How Does the Japanese Water Shrew Chimarrogale platycephalus Cross the Concrete Walls of Check Dams?
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The concrete walls of check dams are considered a physical barrier for aquatic and semiaquatic animals that inhabit mountain streams. Traveling behaviors around concrete check dams by the Japanese water shrew Chimarrogale platycephalus, a semi-aquatic mammal, were directly observed via radio-tracking in Kamikoshi Stream in central Honshu, Japan. Traveling behaviors were mainly observed on the wet concrete walls and in the backfill sediments of check dams. Chimarrogale platycephalus generally crossed the wall directly, and route selection was affected by the traveling direction of C. platycephalus and the surface wetness of the concrete wall. Detouring behavior around the concrete walls was observed visually only once during the survey period. Using modulation of sounds on a FM receiver, the movements of C. platycephalus were detected in their hiding places along the stream. Some individuals frequently ceased movement within the backfill sediments. Our results suggest that existing concrete check dams do not prohibit the shrew's movements between upstream and downstream of the river and that backfill sediments may be utilized as resting places.

© The Mammal Society of Japan
Hiroaki Saito, Hiroshi Hashimoto, Teruaki Hino, and Masaharu Motokawa "How Does the Japanese Water Shrew Chimarrogale platycephalus Cross the Concrete Walls of Check Dams?," Mammal Study 44(1), 1-11, (5 January 2019). https://doi.org/10.3106/ms2017-0056
Received: 19 August 2017; Accepted: 16 June 2018; Published: 5 January 2019
JOURNAL ARTICLE
11 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top