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1 January 2014 Spatial Dynamics of Canopy Trees in an Old Growth Eastern Hemlock Forest in the Central Appalachian Highlands
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Abstract

Understanding the shifting spatial distribution of trees is central to our knowledge of forest dynamics. We studied the spatial distribution of Tsuga canadensis L. Carr (Eastern Hemlock) as a function of age and size of canopy trees (greater than 75 cm dbh) and proximity to a stream in a remnant old growth forest fragment that has no record of human clearing or logging (Cathedral State Park, West Virginia). There appeared to be relatively continuous regeneration; however, cohort peaks indicated some disturbance history. We found spatially distinct age structures, with trees up to 315 years old. Trees greater than 102 cm dbh, or greater than 241 years old, were, on average, significantly closer to the stream. We suspect that the oldest individuals are concentrated near the stream because they are sheltered from wind disturbance. This knowledge can help us prioritize sites that are most important to protect from the woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) when treating individual trees.

H.P. Griscom, B.G. Griscom, and L. Siderhurst "Spatial Dynamics of Canopy Trees in an Old Growth Eastern Hemlock Forest in the Central Appalachian Highlands," Natural Areas Journal 34(1), (1 January 2014). https://doi.org/10.3375/043.034.0111
Published: 1 January 2014
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