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1 September 2009 Winter Habitat Associations of a Low-Density Moose (Alces americanus) Population in Central Labrador
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Abstract

Alces americanus (Moose) are relatively new to Labrador, having only colonized the area in the late 1940s, and little is known about this population. We conducted large-scale aerial surveys for Moose in a 122,000-km2 area during winter 2000 and in a 29,900-km2 area in winter 2001. Moose densities were low in each area (1.6–3.0 Moose per 100 km2). Bull:cow ratios were nearly even and calf:cow ratios were relatively high, indicative of a population exposed to little hunting or predation pressure. Twinning rates were low, suggesting low range productivity. Moose used riparian areas and hardwood stands in higher proportion than their availability in winter (P < 0.05). Open habitats (conifer-lichen woodlands, bogs and fens, burned forest, and barren areas) were used in lower proportion than their availability. These data may provide the basis for developing habitat suitability maps for Moose in late winter across central Labrador.

Thomas S. Jung, Tony E. Chubbs, Colin G. Jones, Frank R. Phillips, and Robert D. Otto "Winter Habitat Associations of a Low-Density Moose (Alces americanus) Population in Central Labrador," Northeastern Naturalist 16(3), (1 September 2009). https://doi.org/10.1656/045.016.n313
Published: 1 September 2009
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