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1 December 2001 USE OF AN EPIPHYTIC MOSS TO BIOMONITOR POLLUTANT LEVELS IN SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
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Abstract

A native epiphytic moss (Dicranum montanum Hedw.) growing on the trunks of northern red oak trees (Quercus rubra L.) was utilized to biomonitor atmospheric deposition within a mixed-hardwood forest along a ridgetop in southwestern Pennsylvania. Factor analysis and analysis of means revealed a location-related chemical signature in the forest moss that was spatially associated with local industrial/urban emissions, and especially with the metals/transition metals As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn. This study documented the usefulness of D. montanum as a biomonitor for pollutant deposition, the utilization of epiphytic stem mosses in capturing stemflow pollutants, and provides a baseline dataset for monitoring relative changes in emissions/depositions in the study area.

Donald D. Davis, James R. McClenahen, and Russell J. Hutnik "USE OF AN EPIPHYTIC MOSS TO BIOMONITOR POLLUTANT LEVELS IN SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA," Northeastern Naturalist 8(4), (1 December 2001). https://doi.org/10.1656/1092-6194(2001)008[0379:UOAEMT]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 December 2001
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