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1 September 2004 POPULATION ECOLOGY OF COLUMBIAN BLACK-TAILED DEER IN URBAN VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON
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Abstract

Little is known of the population ecology of black-tailed deer in urban environments. We investigated blacktail survival, productivity, and population rate-of-increase in urban Vancouver, Washington, from 1999 to 2001. We captured and radio-tagged 19 deer and located radio-tagged deer 1 to 4 times per week. Average annual survival pooled over 2 y was 0.70 (s = 0.09) for does and 0.86 (s = 0.12) for bucks. The majority of deer mortality (5 of 6) was due to trauma from collisions with either cars (n = 3) or trains (n = 2); the remaining death was likely an illegal kill. Adult does produced a minimum of 1.83 and 1.36 fawns in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Minimum fawn survival was calculated as 0.69 (s = 0.09) by assuming that all fawns died whose mother was killed after weaning. Maximum potential fawn survival was calculated as 0.84 (s = 0.08) by censoring fawns whose mothers were killed after weaning. Demographic analysis indicated that the deer population was producing a surplus of young and was increasing at an annual rate of ≥16%/y.

Louis C. Bender, Jeffrey C. Lewis, and David P. Anderson "POPULATION ECOLOGY OF COLUMBIAN BLACK-TAILED DEER IN URBAN VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON," Northwestern Naturalist 85(2), 53-59, (1 September 2004). https://doi.org/10.1898/1051-1733(2004)085<0053:PEOCBD>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 15 January 2004; Published: 1 September 2004
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