Translator Disclaimer
1 January 2016 The Triggers of Fledging in Rhinoceros Auklets Cerorhinca monocerata Chicks When They Experienced Mass Recession, Examined by a Supplementary Feeding Experiment
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Older or heavier Rhinoceros Auklet Cerorhinca monocerata chicks are less likely to remain in their nest during pre-fledging mass recession. Older or heavier chicks have longer wings but the individual variation in wing length at fledging is small. To identify proximate triggers of fledging from a mix of candidates when chicks experienced mass recession, we selected 30 nest boxes each containing a chick and provided half of them with 30–60 g of supplementary foods in an attempt to expand their variation in growth rate. When chicks reached the minimum wing length required for fledging (130 mm), we stopped all provisioning (supplementary and parental) by closing a hatch on the nest box entrance thereby simulating mass recession and inducing fledging. With these treatments, we examined whether timing of fledging (=duration of mass recession) was only triggered by wing length to a threshold size or whether timing of fledging was delayed by younger age at peak mass or lighter peak body mass. Our results indicate that younger chicks remained in their nests longer than older chicks at the beginning of pre-fledging mass recession, regardless of the small variation in wing length among individuals. Annual variation in the duration of mass recession was also detected but body mass was not the trigger for fledging. Measurement of baseline corticosterone level indicated a negative trend between the corticosterone level and the number of days between the measurement date and the fledging date.

© The Ornithological Society of Japan 2016
Tomohiro Deguchi, Hiroko Nomura, Ryoko Otsuka, Masaru Wada, and Yutaka Watanuki "The Triggers of Fledging in Rhinoceros Auklets Cerorhinca monocerata Chicks When They Experienced Mass Recession, Examined by a Supplementary Feeding Experiment," Ornithological Science 15(1), 15-21, (1 January 2016). https://doi.org/10.2326/osj.15.15
Received: 2 April 2015; Accepted: 11 July 2015; Published: 1 January 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top