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1 November 2005 Predation risk and nest-site characteristics of the Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps: the role of plant strength
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Abstract

I examined both natural and artificial nests to investigate the relationship between nest-site characteristics and the risk of nest predation in a grassland-nesting passerine, the Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps. Although an early-season artificial nest experiment did not detect significant effects because of infrequent predation, a late-season experiment indicated that nests were more likely to be depredated at sites where Phragmites reeds were highly dominant. Stems of the common reed P. communis are extremely thick and strong compared to those of other grasses. The results suggest that strong stems aid the effective search and attack on bird nests by predators. Among natural nests, however, predation was not explained by any nest-site characteristics, suggesting that the activity of parents and nestlings masked the effect of plant strength on nest predation.

Shoji HAMAO "Predation risk and nest-site characteristics of the Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps: the role of plant strength," Ornithological Science 4(2), 147-153, (1 November 2005). https://doi.org/10.2326/osj.4.147
Received: 31 May 2005; Accepted: 1 August 2005; Published: 1 November 2005
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