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1 December 2010 Habitat Selection Among Nesting, Foraging, and Singing Sites of the Gray-Cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia in Northeastern Taiwan
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Abstract

This study compared microhabitat characteristics among nesting, foraging, and singing sites of the Gray-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia in the Fushan Experimental Forest, northeastern Taiwan. Habitat variables, including height above ground, vegetation level, vegetation density at locations where these three types of behavior occurred, and structure, height and diameter at breast height (dbh) of the plant used were recorded from March to July of 2002. The Gray-cheeked Fulvetta predominantly nested in bushes and among herbs (86.7%), but usually foraged and sang in trees (70.8% and 78.3%, respectively). Consequently, significant differences were found in the structure of plants and vegetation level used among nesting, foraging, and singing behavior. Gray-cheeked Fulvettas built their nests at an average height of 1.05 m; however, they foraged around 3.75 m and sang at 5.30 m above ground. On the other hand, nests were situated within the most concealed area, with an average vegetation density of 74%, significantly greater than those of the foraging and singing sites (45%, 38%, respectively). The differential use of microhabitat among these three types of behavior strongly exhibits the divergent adaptation of different behaviors to a bird's environment. This is the first report on habitat selection of various behaviors of the Gray-cheeked Fulvetta, and will contribute to our understanding of the species' dominant role in most lowland forests in Taiwan.

© The Ornithological Society of Japan 2010
Pei-Yin Lee, Lih-Jih Wang, Huang-Che Hsu, Lien-Siang Chou, and Chao-Chich Chen "Habitat Selection Among Nesting, Foraging, and Singing Sites of the Gray-Cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia in Northeastern Taiwan," Ornithological Science 9(2), (1 December 2010). https://doi.org/10.2326/osj.9.135
Received: 10 January 2010; Accepted: 1 September 2010; Published: 1 December 2010
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