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1 July 2007 Human Impacts on the Nearshore Environment: An Archaeological Case Study from Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
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Abstract

Archaeology provides a long-term framework to document prehistoric resource use and habitat modification. Excavation at Nu‘alolo Kai, Kaua‘i, yielded a large, well-preserved shellfish assemblage. Analysis determined the susceptibility of mollusk communities to human foraging pressures in the past. Some coral reef and intertidal species, such as Turbo sandwicensis and Strombus maculatus, declined in abundance as a result of heavy exploitation. In contrast, shoreline mollusk communities remained fairly stable through time. Archaeological research provides baselines for modern conservation efforts and fisheries management.

Alex E. Morrison and Terry L. Hunt "Human Impacts on the Nearshore Environment: An Archaeological Case Study from Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands," Pacific Science 61(3), 325-345, (1 July 2007). https://doi.org/10.2984/1534-6188(2007)61[325:HIOTNE]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 September 2006; Published: 1 July 2007
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