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1 December 2016 Habitat Use and Avoidance by Foraging Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers in East Texas
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Abstract

Picoides borealis (Red-cockaded Woodpecker) is an endangered bird endemic to the Pinus (pine) ecosystems of the southeastern US. Mature pine savannahs with a minimal midstory and lush herbaceous groundcover represent high-quality habitat. This study examines the foraging-habitat patterns of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in East Texas. We present a logistic regression model that best differentiates between foraged and non-foraged habitat. Increases in hardwood-midstory basal area have the greatest negative impact on the probability of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers selecting a habitat patch for foraging. Five additional variables negatively impact foraging probability: shrub height, diameter at breast height (DBH) of pine midstory, canopy closure, density of pine midstory, and density of hardwood midstory. Our model shows a high degree of accuracy as to the probability of habitat-patch selection for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers foraging in East Texas forests composed of different pine species.

John N. Macey, D. Brent Burt, Daniel Saenz, and Richard N. Conner "Habitat Use and Avoidance by Foraging Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers in East Texas," Southeastern Naturalist 15(sp9), 76-89, (1 December 2016). https://doi.org/10.1656/058.015.sp910
Published: 1 December 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
14 PAGES


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