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1 March 2009 Effects of Supplemental Irrigation on Populations of Clover Mite, Bryobia praetiosa Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), and Other Arthropods in a Kentucky Bluegrass Lawn
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Abstract

Clover mite, Bryobia praetiosa Koch, is a widespread pest of coolseason turfgrasses and a frequent nuisance invader of homes. It has primarily been managed by use of pesticides applied to lawn areas, but all effective materials used for this purpose have recently had dramatically curtailed registered uses on turfgrass. Preliminary observations suggested that supplemental irrigation could negatively affect clover mite populations, and studies were conducted in 1997 and 1998 to better quantify the effect of twice weekly 2.5-cm spring irrigations on clover mites. During both study years, following irrigation, numbers of clover mites were about twice as low on irrigated turfgrass compared to that receiving natural precipitation alone. In the second year, effects on larvae seemed to be greater than on nymphs and adults. Abundance of thrips also was less on irrigated plots in 1997.

Karen Kramer and Whitney S. Cranshaw "Effects of Supplemental Irrigation on Populations of Clover Mite, Bryobia praetiosa Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), and Other Arthropods in a Kentucky Bluegrass Lawn," Southwestern Entomologist 34(1), (1 March 2009). https://doi.org/10.3958/059.034.0106
Published: 1 March 2009
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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