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1 December 2016 Nezara viridula (L.)1 in Central Texas: II. Seasonal Occurrence of Black-Spotted Condition in Adult Females
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Abstract

Southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.), plagues cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., and other row crops annually after successfully overwintering in the Cotton Belt of the southeastern United States. A physiological marker — black-spotted condition — alluding to overwintering status, or preparation for overwintering, was previously reported in the female reproductive system, and a similar marker was found in southern green stink bug adults collected in Central Texas. This report expands the latter finding through clearer identification and discussion regarding the potential origin of the marker. Additionally, the seasonal occurrence of the black-spotted condition is identified relative to associated host plant species. In five plant species, the condition was observed primarily during late season, with frequencies ranging from 3.0–10.0% of samples possessing the blackspotted condition. This report sheds new insight into biology and ecology and presents a tool to aid producers in making decisions for implementing management tactics to control southern green stink bug in Central Texas. Additional research, however, is needed to elucidate the exact cause and true implications of the blackspotted condition in southern green stink bug adults in Central Texas.

Jesus F. Esquivel "Nezara viridula (L.)1 in Central Texas: II. Seasonal Occurrence of Black-Spotted Condition in Adult Females," Southwestern Entomologist 41(4), (1 December 2016). https://doi.org/10.3958/059.041.0421
Published: 1 December 2016
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