Translator Disclaimer
31 March 2013 Implications for New Zealand of potentially invasive ticks sympatric with Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The ixodid tick Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann, a broadly western Pacific species, is the only economically important tick that has successfully invaded New Zealand. Species sympatric with it could also pose a risk to New Zealand as potential invaders because they share bioclimatic and host preferences with H. longicornis. At least 15 of the 45 species of Ixodidae and one Argasidae discussed here as sympatric with H. longicornis, and which most closely match its bioecological characteristics, pose the highest risk. These include: Amblyomma breviscutatum, Dermacentor reticulatus, D. silvarum, Haemaphysalis hystricis, H. papuana, Ixodes acutitarsus, I. cornuatus, I. holocyclus, I. nipponensis, I. ovatus, I. persulcatus, I. ricinus, I. tasmani,Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides and R. sanguineus. The principal countries of origin of these species are Japan, China and Australia, and in each case humans could be an unwitting vehicle of entry. Sympatry and shared biological preferences are not necessarily indicative of potential invasiveness, but serve as indicators of the need for heightened surveillance.

© 2013 Systematic & Applied Acarology Society
A.C.G. Heath "Implications for New Zealand of potentially invasive ticks sympatric with Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae)," Systematic and Applied Acarology 18(1), 1-26, (31 March 2013). https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.18.1.1
Accepted: 1 February 2013; Published: 31 March 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
26 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top