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1 September 2012 Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects
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Abstract

Introducing students to the process of scientific inquiry is a major goal of high school and college labs. Environmental toxins are of great concern and public interest. Modifications of a vertebrate developmental toxicity assay using the frog Xenopus laevis can support student-initiated toxicology experiments that are relevant to humans. Teams of students formulate hypotheses, perform experiments, analyze data, and present their results. By performing experiments to investigate the toxicity of household chemicals, pharmaceuticals, or agricultural chemicals, students will gain an appreciation of the environmental effects of improper disposal of common chemicals and industrial or agricultural run-off.

© 2012 by National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp.
Roger Sauterer and James R. Rayburn "Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects," The American Biology Teacher 74(7), (1 September 2012). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2012.74.7.12
Published: 1 September 2012
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