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1 January 2013 Clay Caterpillar Whodunit: A Customizable Method for Studying Predator—Prey Interactions in the Field
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Abstract

Predator—prey dynamics are an important concept in ecology, often serving as an introduction to the field of community ecology. However, these dynamics are difficult for students to observe directly. We describe a methodology that employs model caterpillars made of clay to estimate rates of predator attack on a prey species. This approach can be implemented as a field laboratory in almost any natural or seminatural setting, and is designed to allow educators to pursue any number of student-generated hypotheses representing varying degrees of scientific sophistication ranging from middle school to college level.

©2013 by National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjournah.com/reprintinfo.asp .
Rachel Curtis, Jeffrey A. Klemens, Salvatore J. Agosta, Andrew W. Bartlow, Steve Wood, Jason A. Carlson, Jeffrey A. Stratford, and Michael A. Steele "Clay Caterpillar Whodunit: A Customizable Method for Studying Predator—Prey Interactions in the Field," The American Biology Teacher 75(1), 47-51, (1 January 2013). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2013.75.1.10
Published: 1 January 2013
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