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1 May 2015 “Bugs on Bugs”: An Inquiry-Based, Collaborative Activity to Learn Arthropod & Microbial Biodiversity
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Abstract

Diverse communities of arthropods and microbes provide humans with essential ecosystem goods and services. Arthropods are the most diverse and abundant macroscopic animals on the planet, and many remain to be discovered. Much less is known about microbial diversity, despite their importance as free-living species and as symbionts. We created “Bugs on Bugs” as an inquiry-based research project in which students investigate both arthropod and microbe diversity by collecting arthropods and culturing their symbionts. “Bugs on Bugs” was developed as a multiple-course project in which students from different disciplines specialize in parts of the project and collaborate in project design and data analysis. We provide instructions for use of “Bugs on Bugs” in active-learning courses, share experiences in which a biodiversity course and a microbiology course completed “Bugs on Bugs” together at our institution, and share suggestions for implementation based on our experiences.

©2015 by National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved.
Evan C. Lampert and Jeanelle M. Morgan "“Bugs on Bugs”: An Inquiry-Based, Collaborative Activity to Learn Arthropod & Microbial Biodiversity," The American Biology Teacher 77(5), 323-331, (1 May 2015). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2015.77.5.2
Published: 1 May 2015
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