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1 November 2018 A Microbiology Teaching Lab: Using Koch's Postulates to Determine the Cause of “Peep Pox” in Marshmallow Peeps
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Abstract

Koch's postulates are regularly included in the lecture portion of microbiology courses, but rarely are they demonstrated in a microbiology teaching lab. This is understandable given the logistical challenges of undergraduates working with pathogenic bacteria, ethical concerns using animals, and limited time constraints of a weekly lab period. Here we present a cost-effective, timefriendly lab activity that demonstrates the principles of microbial isolation and infection assays that are part of fulfilling Koch's postulates. The disease is “peep pox” caused by a gelatinase-positive bacterial species hydrolyzing marshmallow peeps that proxy as infected animals.

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John L. Dahl and Wayne Gatlin "A Microbiology Teaching Lab: Using Koch's Postulates to Determine the Cause of “Peep Pox” in Marshmallow Peeps," The American Biology Teacher 80(9), (1 November 2018). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2018.80.9.676
Published: 1 November 2018
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