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1 January 2014 Phenology and Pollinator-Prey Conflict in the Carnivorous Plant, Sarracenica alata
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Abstract

Carnivorous plants inhabit nutrient-poor soils and capture insects to supplement the nutrients that can be acquired from the soil. However, most carnivorous plants also utilize insect pollinators, potentially leading to a “pollinator-prey conflict.” The phenology of pitcher and flower development in Sarracenia alata was examined in order to determine whether this species might avoid pollinator-prey conflict by phenological differences in the production and activity of flowers and traps. In two sites examined in different years, the phenological patterns of flower and pitcher development were significantly different. Less than 1% of plants had flowers and pitchers active at the same time. These phenological differences in activity patterns of flowers and pitchers result in little opportunity for pollinator-prey conflict in this species but may have evolved for other reasons.

2013, American Midland Naturalist
John D. Horner "Phenology and Pollinator-Prey Conflict in the Carnivorous Plant, Sarracenica alata," The American Midland Naturalist 171(1), (1 January 2014). https://doi.org/10.1674/0003-0031-171.1.153
Received: 10 April 2013; Accepted: 1 August 2013; Published: 1 January 2014
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