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1 January 2005 IS NEST PREDATION BY STELLER'S JAYS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI) INCIDENTAL OR THE RESULT OF A SPECIALIZED SEARCH STRATEGY?
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Abstract

Decreased nest success and elevated levels of nest predation have been linked to changes in landscape configuration and increased edge. However, our current understanding of the mechanics of nest predation is limited. Using radiotelemetry and artificial nest experiments, we studied the ranging and nest-predation behavior of the Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) in the managed forests of western Washington. Steller's Jays used a variety of forest seral stages, 95% of foraging observations occurred within 50 m of edges, and home range did not appear to be influenced by breeding success. Predation on artificial nests was elevated in high-use areas of home ranges, which suggests that Steller's Jays find nests incidentally while foraging for primary prey (insects). Steller's Jays did not appear to use a specialized search strategy to find nests, though they had a search image for nests and were capable of performing area-restricted searching for other food items (peanuts). To assess the risk of nest predation by Steller's Jays, it may be useful for managers to survey areas of concern for Steller's Jays and their foods. By equating relative abundance of Steller's Jays with nest predation risk, managers can then map predation risk onto the landscape of concern at the scale of the management unit.

¿Es la Depredación de Nidos por Cyanocitta stelleri Incidental o es el Resultado de una Estrategia de Búsqueda Especializada?

Stacey M. Vigallon and John M. Marzluff "IS NEST PREDATION BY STELLER'S JAYS (CYANOCITTA STELLERI) INCIDENTAL OR THE RESULT OF A SPECIALIZED SEARCH STRATEGY?," The Auk 122(1), 36-49, (1 January 2005). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2005)122[0036:INPBSJ]2.0.CO;2
Received: 3 April 2003; Accepted: 16 July 2004; Published: 1 January 2005
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