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1 January 2006 TESTOSTERONE DOES NOT INCREASE IN RESPONSE TO CONSPECIFIC CHALLENGES IN THE WHITE-BELLIED ANTBIRD (MYRMECIZA LONGIPES), A RESIDENT TROPICAL PASSERINE
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Abstract

Resident tropical passerines that exhibit year-round territorial aggression do not fit well into the temperate-zone model, because testosterone does not increase substantially during the breeding season. We studied patterns of testosterone secretion in the White-bellied Antbird (Myrmeciza longipes), a resident tropical species in Panama that maintains territories year-round and is capable of aggression throughout the year, regardless of its stage of reproduction. Levels of plasma testosterone were low (mean = 0.30 ng mL−1) throughout the breeding and nonbreeding seasons and did not differ between them. Testosterone also did not increase in response to simulated conspecific intrusions. When we used temporary removal experiments to induce natural, extended conflict between males, testosterone levels did not increase in response to the extended social instability that resulted. White-bellied Antbirds demonstrate an apparent uncoupling of testosterone and territorial aggression throughout the year.

La Testosterona no Aumenta como Respuesta a Desafíos de Individuos Coespecíficos en Myrmeciza longipes, un Paserino Residente de la Zona Tropical

Bradley C. Fedy and Bridget J. M. Stutchbury "TESTOSTERONE DOES NOT INCREASE IN RESPONSE TO CONSPECIFIC CHALLENGES IN THE WHITE-BELLIED ANTBIRD (MYRMECIZA LONGIPES), A RESIDENT TROPICAL PASSERINE," The Auk 123(1), 61-66, (1 January 2006). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2006)123[0061:TDNIIR]2.0.CO;2
Received: 6 September 2004; Accepted: 11 May 2005; Published: 1 January 2006
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