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1 January 2007 BROOD SEX RATIOS ARE RELATED TO MALE SIZE BUT NOT TO ATTRACTIVENESS IN COMMON YELLOWTHROATS (GEOTHLYPIS TRICHAS)
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Abstract

When the reproductive value of sons differs from that of daughters, selection will favor broods biased toward the sex that can provide greater fitness benefits. In species where female choice is based on male ornamentation, females mated to highly ornamented males may experience a reproductive advantage by skewing the brood sex ratio toward sons. In the Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), males with larger black facial masks are more likely to gain a social mate and sire extrapair young and, as a result, have increased seasonal reproductive success. Females mated to larger-masked males could benefit if they produced more sons. Given that larger- masked males are preferred as extrapair sires, females may also benefit by producing more extrapair sons. We tested these hypotheses during a five-year study of Common Yellowthroats in Wisconsin. Contrary to our predictions, females did not produce more sons when mated to males with larger masks, and extrapair young were not more likely to be male. However, sons were more likely to be sired by males with longer tarsi, which suggests that females may respond to male body size rather than to male ornament size.

El Cociente de Sexos en las Nidadas Está Relacionado con el Tamaño de los Machos pero no con el Atractivo en Geothlypis trichas

Betsy Abroe, Julia C. Garvin, Marc C. Pedersen, Linda A. Whittingham, and Peter O. Dunn "BROOD SEX RATIOS ARE RELATED TO MALE SIZE BUT NOT TO ATTRACTIVENESS IN COMMON YELLOWTHROATS (GEOTHLYPIS TRICHAS)," The Auk 124(1), 176-184, (1 January 2007). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2007)124[176:BSRART]2.0.CO;2
Received: 13 October 2005; Accepted: 25 January 2006; Published: 1 January 2007
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