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1 January 2007 DAWN AND DAYTIME SINGING BEHAVIOR OF CHIPPING SPARROWS (SPIZELLA PASSERINA)
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Abstract

Songbirds typically have small-to-large repertoires of different song types used in complex patterns over a day or season, but what remains poorly understood are patterns of song use by songbirds that have a single, simple song. Here, on the basis of extensive field observations, we reveal how a male Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) varies its simple, repetitive song to create a dynamic singing performance. During the day, and beginning shortly after males arrive on their territories, males typically sing long songs at a relatively slow rate from the tops of trees near the center of their territories. About two weeks after males have arrived, they begin to sing well before sunrise; during this dawn chorus, songs are brief and delivered rapidly, typically while males face each other on the ground at territorial boundaries. Each male sings this way during the dawn chorus throughout the breeding season, except when his female is fertile. By contrast, daytime singing essentially stops after a male pairs. The dawn chorus appears to mediate social interactions among territorial neighbors, whereas daytime songs function in long-distance territory advertisement, particularly for female attraction.

Comportamiento de Canto al Amanecer y Durante el Día en Spizella passerina

Wan-Chun Liu and Donald E. Kroodsma "DAWN AND DAYTIME SINGING BEHAVIOR OF CHIPPING SPARROWS (SPIZELLA PASSERINA)," The Auk 124(1), 44-52, (1 January 2007). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2007)124[44:DADSBO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 10 November 2004; Accepted: 5 January 2006; Published: 1 January 2007
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