Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2007 KING EIDER (SOMATERIA SPECTABILIS) BROOD ECOLOGY: CORRELATES OF DUCKLING SURVIVAL
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Events during duckling growth can influence waterfowl population dynamics. To gain insight into King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) brood ecology, we monitored 111 and 46 individually marked ducklings from broods of 23 and 11 radiomarked King Eiders during 2000 and 2001, respectively. We used capture-mark-resight data to model apparent survival of King Eider ducklings and broods, and multistratum analysis to estimate probabilities of (1) movement among habitats and (2) apparent survival of ducklings that used various habitats. In addition, we recorded length of stay for 7 and 18 radiomarked females with failed nesting attempts during 2000 and 2001, respectively. Complete loss of individual broods accounted for 84% of all duckling mortality (106 of 126 mortalities), with most brood loss (74%; 17 of 23 broods lost) within the first two days after hatch. Estimated apparent survival of ducklings to 24 days of age was 0.10 (95% CI: 0.05 to 0.15). Apparent survival of broods was estimated to be 0.31 (95% CI: 0.13 to 0.50). Our data suggested an interaction between female size and hatch date, whereby larger females whose ducklings also hatched earlier raised more ducklings than either small females or those with ducklings that hatched later. Overland brood movements ≥1 km occurred in both years, and survival was greatest for ducklings on smaller ponds away from the central nesting area at Karrak Lake, Nunavut. Females that experienced nest failure and total brood loss left the study area earlier than females with surviving ducklings.

Écologie d'élevage des couvées de Somateria spectabilis : Corrélations avec la survie des canetons

Katherine R. Mehl and Ray T. Alisauskas "KING EIDER (SOMATERIA SPECTABILIS) BROOD ECOLOGY: CORRELATES OF DUCKLING SURVIVAL," The Auk 124(2), 606-618, (1 April 2007). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2007)124[606:KESSBE]2.0.CO;2
Received: 22 December 2004; Accepted: 4 June 2006; Published: 1 April 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
13 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top