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1 April 2007 DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY, CALIFORNIA
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Abstract

Shorebird roosts are often considered traditional, on the basis of predictable occupancy by large numbers of birds over long periods. However, fidelity of individuals to roosts at fine spatial and temporal scales, particularly at night, has rarely been described. We compared diurnal and nocturnal use of high-tide roosts by radiotagged Dunlin (Calidris alpina pacifica) wintering (November-March) at Humboldt Bay, California. Despite high fidelity to the study area, fidelity to particular roosts was relatively low and highly variable. At night, Dunlin used fewer roosts, were more faithful to primary roosts, and moved shorter distances between successive roosts than during the day. Day and night roosts differed in location, habitat, and distance from tidal flats. At night, Dunlin made greater use of pasture, and less use of islands and manmade structures. Day and night strategies of high-tide space use by Dunlin may be related to differences in food availability or predation danger. Our results illustrate that notions of tradition and site fidelity are scale-dependent and that knowledge of space use across the full range of environmental conditions is necessary for appropriate management of shorebird habitat.

Fidelidad a los Sitios de Descanso Diurnos y Nocturnos en Calidris alpina pacifica en la Bahía de Humboldt, California

Jesse R. Conklin and Mark A. Colwell "DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL ROOST SITE FIDELITY OF DUNLIN (CALIDRIS ALPINA PACIFICA) AT HUMBOLDT BAY, CALIFORNIA," The Auk 124(2), (1 April 2007). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2007)124[677:DANRSF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 25 January 2006; Accepted: 14 June 2006; Published: 1 April 2007
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