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1 July 2010 Unidirectional Hybridization and Introgression in an Avian Contact Zone: Evidence from Genetic Markers, Morphology, and Comparisons with Laboratory-Raised F1 Hybrids
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Abstract

Examination of contact zones between closely related species is important for understanding speciation, because the interactions in such zones may change the evolutionary direction of one or both taxa. To expose the composition and dynamics of a contact zone between two dove species, Streptopelia vinacea and S. capicola, we used mitochondrial DNA, amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, and morphological and color measurements. We combined a field study on contact-zone and parental-species individuals with an examination of F1 hybrids reared in captivity. We found that the contact zone is a narrow hybrid zone characterized by a high frequency of hybrids, a lack of clear parental species forms, a high incidence of S. capicola mtDNA, and an AFLP marker distribution more similar to that of S. vinacea. In morphology and color, field hybrids were more similar to S. vinacea and significantly different from S. capicola. F1 hybrids were more similar to S. capicola in color. The laboratory data showed that both types of mixed matings produced viable F1 offspring. Taken together, the results indicate the existence of a unimodal hybrid zone with asymmetric introgression from S. capicola into S. vinacea. The origin of this hybrid zone is most likely a combination of geographic and behavioral factors and suggests a balance between dispersal and selection.

© 2010 by The American Ornithologists' Union. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions website, http://www.ucpressjournals. com/reprintInfo.asp.
Paula M. Den Hartog, Ardie M. Den Boer-Visser, and Carel Ten Cate "Unidirectional Hybridization and Introgression in an Avian Contact Zone: Evidence from Genetic Markers, Morphology, and Comparisons with Laboratory-Raised F1 Hybrids," The Auk 127(3), (1 July 2010). https://doi.org/10.1525/auk.2010.10002
Received: 30 July 2009; Accepted: 1 February 2010; Published: 1 July 2010
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