Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2013 The Relationship between Drinking Water and the Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Values of Tissues in Japanese Quail (Cortunix japonica)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Developing an understanding of how differences in the dietary ecology and physiology of different species can influence the incorporation of hydrogen and oxygen from resources into consumer tissues is an important factor to consider when designing, or interpreting data from, ecological studies using stable isotope analyses of these elements. Here, we present the results of an experiment designed to examine the relationship between the δ2H and δ18O of drinking water and the δ2H and δ18O values of body water, blood plasma, red blood cells, intestine, liver, muscle, and feathers of Japanese Quail (Cortunix japonica). Because Japanese Quail have high drinking-water requirements compared with many other bird species, we hypothesized that the relative contribution of drinking water to tissue δ2H and δ18O values would be higher than that of bird species with lower drinking-water requirements. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of drinking water to the δ2H and δ18O values of tissues is generally higher in Japanese Quail than in other birds with lower drinking-water rates. However, we failed to find significant relationships between drinking-water isotope values and tissue isotope values in many of the tissues that we examined. We suspect that this lack of significant relationships is the result of variation in tissue isotope values caused by differences in drinking-water consumption rates among individual birds. Given these results, we recommend that researchers use caution when interpreting data from ecological investigations using δ2H and δ18O analyses.

©2013 by The American Ornithologists’ Union.
Nathan Wolf, Seth D. Newsome, Marilyn L. Fogel, and Carlos Martinez Del Rio "The Relationship between Drinking Water and the Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Values of Tissues in Japanese Quail (Cortunix japonica)," The Auk 130(2), 323-330, (1 April 2013). https://doi.org/10.1525/auk.2013.12075
Received: 12 April 2012; Accepted: 1 January 2013; Published: 1 April 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top