Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2013 Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) Breeding Demography Across a Gradient of Savanna, Woodland, and Forest in the Missouri Ozarks
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Better knowledge of bird response to savanna and woodland restoration is needed to inform management of these communities. We related temporal and habitat variables to breeding demography and densities of the Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest. We determined nest success, clutch size, young fledged, and breeding densities and evaluated support for relationships with year, nest stage, date, nest height, tree cover, and percent forest in a 10-km radius. One hundred and twenty-eight of 310 nests (41.3%) fledged young. The most supported nest-survival model included nest stage and percent forest in the landscape. Daily nest survival was greater in the incubation than in the nestling stage and increased substantially with decreasing forest in the landscape. Four nests (1.3%) were parasitized by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater). Eastern WoodPewee density increased 83% over a range of 10–170% tree cover (percent tree stocking). Increased nest success with decreasing forest in the landscape indicates that Eastern Wood-Pewees are not highly susceptible to forest-fragmentation effects in the Missouri Ozarks, probably because they were not very susceptible to brood parasitism. The absence of any strong relationships between habitat measures and nest success, clutch size, or young fledged is in contrast to the large increase in density over the range of tree cover and is further evidence that variation in bird density does not always correspond to similar patterns in productivity.

©2012 by The American Ornithologists’ Union.
Sarah W. Kendrick, Frank R. Thompson, and Jennifer L. Reidy "Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) Breeding Demography Across a Gradient of Savanna, Woodland, and Forest in the Missouri Ozarks," The Auk 130(2), (1 April 2013). https://doi.org/10.1525/auk.2013.12209
Received: 2 November 2012; Accepted: 1 February 2013; Published: 1 April 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top