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1 June 2005 The Distribution of Some Rare Coastal Lichens in the Pacific Northwest and Their Association with Late-seral and Federally-protected Forests
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Abstract

Using data from randomly-selected surveys, historic locations, and ‘purposive’ surveys of likely habitats, fifteen rare epiphytic lichens (Bryoria pseudocapillaris, B. spiralifera, B. subcana, Erioderma sorediatum, Heterodermia leucomela, Hypotrachyna revoluta, Leioderma sorediatum, Leptogium brebissonii, Niebla cephalota, Pannaria rubiginosa, Pseudocyphellaria perpetua, Pyrrhospora quernea, Ramalina pollinaria, Teloschistes flavicans, and Usnea hesperina) were assessed for frequency and distribution on publicly owned lands along the immediate Pacific coast from the Canadian border south to San Francisco and for association with late seral forests and federally protected lands. A total of 178 sites of 0.04 ha each were surveyed in 2000 and 2001; 129 were randomly selected. The major distribution patterns were CA and OR coastlines ± Puget Sound, OR and WA coastlines, and OR and WA Coast and western Cascades Ranges, following major regional climatic gradients. Frequency varied considerably by state, all lichens except P. quernea were rare in at least one state (no detections among randomly selected survey sites). Odds ratio tests provided suggestive evidence that most populations of U. hesperina are in forests > 80 years old, and good evidence that forest age is not an important predictor of occurrence for R. pollinaria and H. leucomela. Ten of the target species were associated with ≤ two federally protected land allocations, and none were primarily found on protected allocations. Therefore actions on unprotected state and federal lands in the 21st century will influence persistence. Target populations for conservation are discussed.

Doug A. Glavich, Linda H. Geiser, and Alexander G. Mikulin "The Distribution of Some Rare Coastal Lichens in the Pacific Northwest and Their Association with Late-seral and Federally-protected Forests," The Bryologist 108(2), 241-254, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1639/0007-2745(2005)108[0241:TDOSRC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 9 September 2003; Accepted: 1 December 2004; Published: 1 June 2005
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