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1 September 2008 Arboreal Arthropod Associations with Epiphytes Following Gap Harvesting in The Acadian Forest of Maine
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Abstract

Arthropod and epiphyte assemblages were compared at three heights (0–2, 2–4 and 4–6 m) on the boles of red maple (Acer rubrum) trees located in a closed canopy forest and within harvest gaps. A positive correlation among bryophytes, Collembola (springtails) and Araneae (spiders) suggested a potential trophic interaction where arboreal spiders, during early developmental stages, were dependent upon availability of Collembolan prey. This relationship appeared to be sensitive to a decline in bryophyte abundance that occurred following gap harvesting. Fifteen families of Diptera (flies) were identified, eight of which were common. The eight common families utilized the arboreal habitat differently depending on height along the bole and abundance of crustose and other lichens. A potential association was identified between six Dipteran families and a Collembolan morphospecies in the family Entomobryidae, suggesting a diverse arthropod community that exploits different attributes of the arboreal habitat and exhibits varied responses to harvest gaps.

Kathryn M. Miller, Robert G. Wagner, and Stephen A. Woods "Arboreal Arthropod Associations with Epiphytes Following Gap Harvesting in The Acadian Forest of Maine," The Bryologist 111(3), 424-434, (1 September 2008). https://doi.org/10.1639/0007-2745(2008)111[424:AAAWEF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 21 July 2006; Accepted: 1 March 2007; Published: 1 September 2008
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