Translator Disclaimer
1 August 2002 NEST PREDATORS, NEST-SITE SELECTION, AND NESTING SUCCESS OF THE DUSKY FLYCATCHER IN A MANAGED PONDEROSA PINE FOREST
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Among hypotheses explaining nest-site selection, the potential-prey-site hypothesis predicts that birds place nests in areas with many potential nest sites, while the nest-concealment hypothesis predicts nest placement in sites with greater surrounding vegetation. We examined these hypotheses by comparing habitat attributes between Dusky Flycatcher (Empidonax oberholseri) nest sites and random sites, successful and unsuccessful nests, and nests depredated by birds versus mammals. Nesting success was 28% (n = 167), and predation was the most important cause of nest failure (96%) during the study (1998–2000) at our site in northeastern California. We identified 28 nest predators using surveillance cameras. Sciurid mammals were the most common predators (17 of 28, 61%), with Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii; 25%), small owls (11%), and Steller's Jays (Cyanocitta stelleri; 3%) accounting for the rest. Raptors preyed on nestlings more frequently than on eggs, while small mammals depredated nestlings and eggs in proportion to their availability. Dusky Flycatchers nested in larger shrub patches with greater shrub cover than at random sites, supporting the potential-prey-site hypothesis. Successful nests were in larger shrub patches surrounded by fewer seedlings and saplings compared to depredated nests, providing equivocal support for the potential-prey-site hypothesis. Nests depredated by birds were less concealed, located in smaller shrub patches, surrounded by fewer seedlings and saplings, and were closer to the shrub edge than nests depredated by mammals. Our results, strengthened by identification of nest predators, suggest that differences in search strategies among predators may constrain the ability of Dusky Flycatchers to optimize nest-site selection.

Depredadores de Nidos, Selección de Sitios de Anidación y Éxito de Anidación de Empidonax oberholseri en un Bosque Manejado de Pino Ponderosa

Resumen. Entre las hipótesis que explican la selección de sitios de anidación, la de “presa potencial” predice que las aves ubican sus nidos en lugares con muchos sitios de anidación, mientras que la de “ocultación del nido” predice la ubicación de nidos en sitios con mayor vegetación circundante. Nosotros examinamos estas hipótesis comparando características del hábitat entre sitios de anidación del mosquerito Empidonax oberholseri y sitios aleatorios, entre nidos exitosos y no exitosos, y entre nidos depredados por aves y por mamíferos. Entre 1998 y 2000 en un área del noreste de California, el éxito de anidación fue del 28% (n = 167) y la depredación fue la causa más importante del fracaso de los nidos (96%). Identificamos 28 depredadores de nidos utilizando cámaras. Los mamíferos sciúridos fueron los depredadores más comunes (17 de 28, 61%), mientras que los demás nidos fueron depredados por Accipter cooperii (25%), búhos pequeños (11%) y Cyanocitta stelleri (3%). Las aves rapaces se alimentaron con mayor frecuencia de pichones que de huevos, mientras que los mamíferos pequeños depredaron pichones y huevos en proporción a su disponibilidad. Los mosqueritos anidaron en parches con mayor cobertura de arbustos que sitios aleatorios, lo cual apoya la hipótesis de presa potencial. Los nidos exitosos se ubicaron en parches de arbustos más grandes rodeados por menos plántulas y renovales en comparación con los nidos depredados, lo que apoya equívocamente la hipótesis de presa potencial. Los nidos depredados por aves estuvieron menos ocultos, ubicados en parches de arbustos más pequeños, rodeados por menos plántulas y renovales, y estuvieron más cerca del borde del matorral que los nidos d

Joseph R. Liebezeit and T. Luke George "NEST PREDATORS, NEST-SITE SELECTION, AND NESTING SUCCESS OF THE DUSKY FLYCATCHER IN A MANAGED PONDEROSA PINE FOREST," The Condor 104(3), 507-517, (1 August 2002). https://doi.org/10.1650/0010-5422(2002)104[0507:NPNSSA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 10 August 2001; Accepted: 1 April 2002; Published: 1 August 2002
JOURNAL ARTICLE
11 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top