Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2003 A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SHINY COWBIRD PARASITISM OF TWO LARGE HOSTS, THE CHALK-BROWED MOCKINGBIRD AND THE RUFOUS-BELLIED THRUSH
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

It is usually accepted that generalist brood parasites should avoid using hosts larger than themselves because host chicks may outcompete parasite chicks for food. We studied the interactions between the Shiny Cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) and two common hosts larger than the parasite, the Chalk-browed Mockingbird (Mimus saturninus) and the Rufous-bellied Thrush (Turdus rufiventris). For each host we determined (1) frequency and intensity of parasitism during the breeding season, (2) nesting success, egg survival, hatching success, and chick survival in unparasitized and parasitized nests, and (3) antiparasitic defenses. We also determined Shiny Cowbird egg survival, hatching success, and chick survival in both hosts. Parasitism reached 50% in mockingbirds and 66% in thrushes. In both species the main cost of parasitism was egg destruction through punctures. Hatching success, survival of host chicks, and nest survival did not differ between unparasitized and parasitized nests. Both hosts rejected parasitic white-morph eggs but accepted spotted-morph ones, even though they were significantly smaller than host eggs. The proportion of cowbirds fledged per egg laid in successful mockingbird and thrush nests was 0.4 and 0.6, respectively. Considering nest survival, reproductive success of Shiny Cowbirds was 0.15 in mockingbird nests and 0.17 in thrush nests. These values are similar to or higher than cowbird success with smaller hosts. Our results indicate that host quality is not only determined by host-parasite differences in body size, and that other factors, such as host defenses and nest survivorship, should be considered.

Un Estudio Comparado del Parasitismo de Molothrus bonariensis en dos Hospedadores de Gran Tamaño, Mimus saturninus y Turdus rufiventris

Resumen. Es aceptado generalmente que los parásitos de cría generalistas deberían evitar utilizar hospedadores de mayor tamaño corporal porque los pichones del hospedador podrían desplazar a sus pichones en la competencia por alimento. Se estudiaron las interacciones entre Molothrus bonariensis y dos hospedadores frecuentes de mayor tamaño que el parásito, Mimus saturninus y Turdus rufiventris. Para cada hospedador se determinó (1) frecuencia e intensidad de parasitismo durante la temporada reproductiva, (2) éxito de nidificación, supervivencia de huevos, éxito de eclosión y supervivencia de pichones en nidos no parasitados y parasitados, y (3) defensas antiparasitarias. También se determinó el éxito reproductivo del parásito en ambos hospedadores. El porcentaje de nidos parasitados fue 50% en Mimus saturninus y 66% en Turdus rufiventris. En ambas especies, el principal costo del parasitismo fue la destrucción de huevos por picaduras. El éxito de eclosión, la supervivencia de pichones y el éxito de nidificación fueron semejantes entre nidos no parasitados y parasitados. Ambos hospedadores rechazaron los huevos parásitos del morfo blanco pero aceptaron los del morfo manchado, si bien éstos fueron de menor tamaño que los del hospedador. La proporción de volantones de Molothrus bonariensis por huevo puesto en nidos exitosos de Mimus saturninus y Turdus rufiventris fue 0.4 y 0.6, respectivamente. Considerando la supervivencia de los nidos, el éxito reproductivo fue 0.15 en Mimus saturninus y 0.17 en Turdus rufiventris. Estos valores son similares o mayores

Paula Sackmann and Juan Carlos Reboreda "A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SHINY COWBIRD PARASITISM OF TWO LARGE HOSTS, THE CHALK-BROWED MOCKINGBIRD AND THE RUFOUS-BELLIED THRUSH," The Condor 105(4), 728-736, (1 November 2003). https://doi.org/10.1650/7194
Received: 16 September 2002; Accepted: 1 July 2003; Published: 1 November 2003
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top