Translator Disclaimer
1 August 2005 VARIATION IN THE STABLE-HYDROGEN ISOTOPE COMPOSITION OF NORTHERN GOSHAWK FEATHERS: RELEVANCE TO THE STUDY OF MIGRATORY ORIGINS
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The analysis of stable-hydrogen isotope ratios in feathers (δDf) allows researchers to investigate avian movements and distributions to an extent never before possible. Nonetheless, natural variation in δDf is poorly understood and, in particular, its implications for predictive models based on stable-hydrogen isotopes remain unclear. We employed hierarchical linear modeling to explore multiple levels of variation in the stable-hydrogen isotope composition of Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) feathers. We examined (1) inter-individual variation among goshawks from the same nest, and (2) intra-individual variation between multiple feathers from the same individual. Additionally, we assessed the importance of several factors (e.g., geographic location, climate, age, and sex characteristics) in explaining variation in δDf. Variation among individuals was nearly eight times the magnitude of variation within an individual, although age differences explained most of this inter-individual variation. In contrast, most variation in δD values between multiple feathers from an individual remained unexplained. Additionally, we suggest temporal patterns of δD in precipitation (δDp) as a potential explanation for the geographic variability in age-related differences that has precluded the description of movement patterns of adult raptors using δDf. Furthermore, intra-individual variability necessitates consistency in feather selection and careful interpretation of δDf-based models incorporating multiple feather types. Finally, although useful for describing the movements of groups of individuals, we suggest that variability inherent to environmental and intra-individual patterns of δDp and δDf, respectively, precludes the use of stable-hydrogen isotopes to describe movements of individual birds.

Variación en la Composición de Isótopos Estables de Hidrógeno de las Plumas de Accipiter gentilis: Relevancia para los Estudios sobre el Origen de la Migración

Resumen. El análisis de los cocientes de isótopos estables de hidrógeno presentes en las plumas (δDf) permite a los investigadores estudiar los movimientos y distribuciones de las aves en un grado nunca antes posible. Sin embargo, la variación natural en δDf es poco entendida, y particularmente sus implicaciones sobre modelos que hacen predicciones con base en isótopos estables de hidrógeno aún permanecen poco claras. Empleamos un modelo lineal jerárquico para explorar múltiples niveles de variación en la composición de isótopos estables de hidrógeno en las plumas de Accipiter gentiles. Examinamos (1) la variación entre individuos de un mismo nido y (2) la variación entre varias plumas de un mismo individuo. Además, determinamos la importancia de varios factores (e.g., aislamiento geográfico, clima, edad y características sexuales) para explicar las variaciones en δDf. La variación entre individuos fue casi ocho veces mayor que la variación en un mismo individuo, aunque diferencias en la edad explicaron la mayoría de esta variación entre individuos. De manera contrastante, la mayor parte de la variación en los valores de δD entre varias plumas de un mismo individuo permaneció inexplicada. Además, sugerimos patrones temporales de δD en la precipitación (δDp) como una posible explicación para la variabilidad geográfica en las diferencias relacionadas con la edad que han imposibilitado la descripción de los patrones de movimiento de aves rapaces adultas utilizando δDf. Asimismo, la variabilidad intra-individual requiere que exista coherencia en la selección de plumas y una interpretación cuidadosa de los modelos basados en δDf que incorporen múltiples tipos de plumas

Adam D. Smith and Alfred M. Dufty Jr. "VARIATION IN THE STABLE-HYDROGEN ISOTOPE COMPOSITION OF NORTHERN GOSHAWK FEATHERS: RELEVANCE TO THE STUDY OF MIGRATORY ORIGINS," The Condor 107(3), 547-558, (1 August 2005). https://doi.org/10.1650/0010-5422(2005)107[0547:VITSIC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 20 August 2004; Accepted: 1 April 2005; Published: 1 August 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
12 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top