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1 August 2006 ROLE OF THE ANTERIOR LATERAL EYES OF THE WOLF SPIDER LYCOSA TARENTULA (ARANEAE, LYCOSIDAE) DURING PATH INTEGRATION
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Abstract

Spiders of the species Lycosa tarentula (Linnaeus 1758) (Araneae, Lycosidae) use a vector navigation system while homing under natural conditions. Under laboratory conditions, in the absence of information relative to the sun's position or any pattern of polarized light, L. tarentula uses a path integration system which consists of turning at a fixed angle similar to one that could carry it to its burrow. In the absence of light, the angle is random. In this study we ask whether the spiders acquire the information about the angle turned during the outward journey through the anterior lateral eyes (ALEs), whose visual fields are directed towards the ground. To answer this question, two groups of animals were studied: one group with only the ALEs covered and another group with all eyes except ALEs covered. Our results show that ALE information alone is adequate to obtain the angle at which the animal should turn when homing.

Joaquín Ortega-Escobar "ROLE OF THE ANTERIOR LATERAL EYES OF THE WOLF SPIDER LYCOSA TARENTULA (ARANEAE, LYCOSIDAE) DURING PATH INTEGRATION," The Journal of Arachnology 34(1), 51-61, (1 August 2006). https://doi.org/10.1636/S04-103.1
Received: 7 December 2004; Published: 1 August 2006
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