Translator Disclaimer
1 January 2005 Influence of shading on the growth and leaf photosynthesis of the invasive non-indigenous plant garlic mustard [Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb) Cavara and Grande] grown under simulated late-winter to mid-spring conditions
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Myers, C. V., R. C. Anderson, and D. L. Byers (Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Section, 4120 Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4120). Influence of shading on the growth and leaf photosynthesis of the invasive non-indigenous plant garlic mustard [Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb) Cavara and Grande] grown under simulated late-winter to mid-spring conditions. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 132: 1–10. 2005.—Plasticity in photosynthetic response to varied light conditions likely contributes to the successful spread and domination of eastern deciduous forest ground layers by the invasive, non-indigenous plant species Alliaria petiolata. We examined the effects of growing plants with no shading, or under 30% or 60% black shade cloth on leaf photosynthetic rates, maximum rates of leaf photosynthesis (Amax) and stomatal conductance (gSmax), light compensation point, above and below ground biomass, chlorophyll content and specific leaf mass of A. petiolata grown under simulated late-winter to mid-spring conditions of temperature, photoperiod, and irradiance in a growth chamber. The 0% shade treatment plants exhibited a significantly greater leaf photosynthetic rate than the 60% shade treatment plants between 800 and 1600 μmol·m−2·s−1 photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD). Leaf Amax was significantly greater for plants grown under no shade than for plants grown under either the 30 or 60% shade treatments and gSmax was higher for plants grown under no shade than plants in the 60% shade treatment. Plants grown under 0 and 30% shade produced significantly more biomass and had greater specific leaf mass than plants grown under 60% shade. Leaves of the 60% shade treatment had significantly greater chlorophyll a and b content than leaves of the 0 and 30% shade treatments. Our results indicate that A. petiolata displays a plastic response to varied light levels in a way that would likely increase its success in invading eastern deciduous forest ground layers.

Caroline V. Myers, Roger C. Anderson, and Diane L. Byers "Influence of shading on the growth and leaf photosynthesis of the invasive non-indigenous plant garlic mustard [Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb) Cavara and Grande] grown under simulated late-winter to mid-spring conditions," The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 132(1), 1-10, (1 January 2005). https://doi.org/10.3159/1095-5674(2005)132[1:IOSOTG]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 January 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
10 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top