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1 August 2016 The effect of treefall gaps on the spatial distribution of three invasive plants in a mature upland forest in Maryland
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Abstract

Invasive plants impact native plant and animal species, communities, and ecosystems. We explore the role of treefall gaps in facilitating invasive species growth. We measured the frequency and density of different life stages of three invasive species: Rubus phoenicolasius, Berberis thunbergii, and Rosa multiflora in an eastern deciduous mature forest. Gaps were important for the establishment, growth, and reproduction of R. phoenicolasius, growth of R. multiflora and reproduction of B. thunbergii. We present several hypotheses as to why we observed a species-specific response of invasive plants to treefall gaps, including propagule rain as a driver of invasive plant establishment.

©Copyright 2016 by The Torrey Botanical Society
Angela G. Driscoll "The effect of treefall gaps on the spatial distribution of three invasive plants in a mature upland forest in Maryland," The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 143(4), 349-358, (1 August 2016). https://doi.org/10.3159/TORREY-D-15-00022.1
Received: 1 May 2015; Published: 1 August 2016
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